Babies need to make eye contact with people, not phones. AFP via Getty

Is secondhand screen time the new secondhand smoking?

By: Joelle Renstrom, Boston University The Environmental Protection Agency first warned of secondhand smoke in 1991, some 30 years after scientists determined that smoking cigarettes

Read more
Maryland and Virginia are both weighing options for reducing the harvest of striped bass, but stricter catch limits may impact recreational anglers more than the commercial fishery. (Dave Harp)

MD, VA mulling options to halt decline in striped bass population

Recreational anglers complain proposals favor commercial, charter fisheries By Timothy B. Wheeler & Jeremy Cox, BayJournal.com(Reprint) Anglers who live for hooking

Read more
On January 10, 2020 in Boston, Massachusetts, Historic St. Mary’s City (HSMC) archaeologist Henry M. Miller received the J. C. Harrington Award from the Society for Historical Archaeology. It is the highest international award for the profession of historical archaeology. Named for J. C. “Pinky” Harrington, a founder of the field who conducted early work at Jamestown, Yorktown and other sites for the National Park Service, the award is given for scholarly contributions to the field. Since its initiation in 1981, only 35 people have received this award. Featured in the group photograph are participants and organizers of a paper session held in Henry Miller’s honor at the Historical Archaeology conference earlier this month. (from left): Robert L. Schuyler (University of Pennsylvania), Laura E. Masur (The Catholic University of America), Travis G. Parno (HSMC), Terry P. Brock (Montpelier Foundation), Henry M. Miller (HSMC), Garry Wheeler Stone (former HSMC Director of Research), Beverly A. Straube (Jamestown-Yorktown Foundation), Douglas Owsley (Smithsonian Institution), and Silas Hurry (HSMC) Image courtesy of Historic St. Mary's City

St. Mary’s City Archeologist Henry M. Miller receives J.C. Harrington Award

News Release, Historic St.Mary’s City St. Mary’s City, MD- On January 10, 2020, in Boston, Massachusetts, Historic St. Mary’s City

Read more