Checking blood pressure using cuff on female. copyright American Heart Association

More stroke awareness, better eating habits may help reduce stroke risk for young adult African Americans

News Release, American Heart Association

Research Highlights:

  • Young African Americans are experiencing higher rates of stroke because of health conditions such as high blood pressure, diabetes, and obesity, yet their perception of their stroke risk is low.  
  • Increased education and better eating habits are important to help reduce stroke risk in young adults.  

DALLAS, Feb. 12, 2020 — Young African American adults are experiencing higher rates of stroke compared to others due to high blood pressurediabetes and obesity, yet their perception of their stroke risk is low, according to preliminary research to be presented at the Nursing Symposium of the American Stroke Association’s International Stroke Conference 2020 – Feb. 18-21 in Los Angeles. The conference is a world premiere meeting for researchers and clinicians dedicated to the science of stroke and brain health.

Researchers analyzed the results of a self-completed questionnaire by 116 young African American adults to get a better understanding of their personal stroke risk, ability to live healthy, nutrition/eating patterns and the role of health literacy in decreasing their chances of stroke. They concluded that increased education about healthy lifestyle choices and better eating habits are important in helping reduce stroke risk among this group.

Most young adults in the study had unhealthy eating habits, based on the American Heart Association’s Life’s Simple 7 recommendations for a healthier lifestyle, despite having high levels of health literacy and a perceived ability to live healthily, 53% had an inaccurate perception about their stroke risk.

The research is a secondary data analysis of the Stroke Counseling for Risk Reduction (SCORRE) study, which was published in August 2019.  

“Nutrition habits are very important to the health of our society and are difficult to change, regardless of levels of health literacy,” said Stacy Perrin, Ph.D., a student investigator of the SCORRE study, and a nurse with several certifications, including the Certified Stroke Registered Nurse credential, at Grady Health System in Atlanta, Georgia. “This research supports the need to target young adults to increase their awareness of the importance of healthy food choices to lower stroke risk.”

Study participants were mostly female African American college students, age 25 on average. While participants averaged three modifiable stroke risk factors, such as poor nutrition, lack of exercise, being overweight and elevated blood pressure readings, 69% reported their future stroke risk as low or no risk. Perception of health and risk was measured on a scale of 0 to 10. On the Association’s Life’s Simple 7 nutrition recommendations, which include five categories (eating more than 4 cups of fruits and vegetables a day, for example), participants averaged a low score of 1.6 out of the five categories.

Among other results:

  • Health literacy levels, with an average 4.4 score out of 6.0, and perceived self-competence to live healthy, with an average 5.9 score out of 7.0, were high.
  • There was no association between health literacy and accuracy of perceived stroke risk.
  • Higher health literacy did not positively impact the ability to live healthy or eating patterns. However, higher perceived risk of future stroke and lower perceived ability to live healthily were significantly associated with poorer eating patterns.

“If people think they’re not at risk of a stroke, they are less likely to change their behavior to reduce the risk because they don’t believe anything is wrong. This perception is not healthy,” Perrin said.

The National Institute of Nursing Research at the National Institutes of Health-funded the SCORRE study and lead investigator, Dawn Aycock, Ph.D., R.N., ANP-BC. Author disclosures are available in the abstract.

Some of the limitations were that the sample was mostly women with some college education and the study relied on self-reports of dietary intake.


The Southern Maryland Chronicle is a local, small business entrusted to provide factual, unbiased reporting to the Southern Maryland Community. While we look to local businesses for advertising, we hope to keep that cost as low as possible in order to attract even the smallest of local businesses and help them get out to the public. We must also be able to pay employees(part-time and full-time), along with equipment, and website related things. We never want to make the Chronicle a “pay-wall” style news site.

To that end, we are looking to the community to offer donations. Whether it’s a one-time donation or you set up a reoccurring monthly donation. It is all appreciated. All donations at this time will be going to furthering the Chronicle through hiring individuals that have the same goals of providing fair, and unbiased news to the community. For now, donations will be going to a business PayPal account I have set-up for the Southern Maryland Chronicle, KDC Designs. All business transactions currently occur within this PayPal account. If you have any questions regarding this you can email me at [email protected]

Thank you for all of your support and I hope to continue bringing Southern Maryland the best news possible for a very long time. — David M. Higgins II




© 2019 The Southern Maryland Chronicle. All Rights Reserved. This website is not intended for users located within the European Economic Area.

 

 

David M. Higgins II

David M. Higgins was born in Baltimore and grew up in Southern Maryland. He has had a passion for journalism since high school. After spending many years in the Hospitality Industry he began working in Digital Marketing, eventually leading him back to his passion. David started The Southern Maryland Chronicle in December 2017 and has grown it to become the #1 news source in Southern Maryland.

David M. Higgins II has 10035 posts and counting. See all posts by David M. Higgins II