The Chesapeake Bay watershed needs to reduce its phosphorus, nitrogen and sediment pollution by 2025. (Adobe Stock)

MD Conference to Focus on Cleaning Up Chesapeake Bay

By: Diane Bernard, Public News Service

BALTIMORE – Stream recovery projects are a cornerstone in helping to reduce pollution in the Chesapeake Bay watershed, and people at the MidAtlantic Stream Restoration Conference on November 18 will explore how to advance these projects.

Stream rehabilitation is more urgent than ever, according to Rich Starr – senior water research scientist with Ecosystem Planning and Restoration – who’ll give opening remarks at the conference.

He says states in the watershed, including Maryland and Virginia, are pushing to fulfill the Environmental Protection Agency’s mandate to reduce nitrogen, phosphorus and sediment pollution flowing into the Chesapeake 60% by 2025.

“I think it’s difficult to say whether we’ll achieve it or not,” says Starr. “But the more positive thing to look at is, the trend is going that way. We are definitely trending towards a healthier bay as a result of the work that’s going on. “

The Baltimore conference comes just a few weeks after Governor Larry Hogan called on Congress to fully fund $85 million of Chesapeake Bay restoration programs in the federal 2020 budget.

Maryland had achieved its overall 2017 goal for the EPA’s Chesapeake Clean Water Blueprint to reduce phosphorus and sediment, but fell short on nitrogen reductions, according to the Chesapeake Bay Foundation.

Starr says nitrogen and phosphorous pollution come from wastewater runoff in urban and suburban areas as well as agriculture. Stream restoration, he adds, helps prevent the runoff from getting to the Bay.

“Stream restoration involves stabilizing the stream, so the banks are no longer excessively eroding and contributing excessive dirt into the stream, and replanting the beds and improving habitat in the stream for aquatic organisms,” says Starr.

He says the conference, hosted by the nonprofit Resource Institute, will have sessions on floodplain restoration, how healthy ecosystems can help with riverbank restorations, and a state-by-state look at controlling sediment, phosphorous and nitrogen in the Chesapeake Bay states.


The Southern Maryland Chronicle is a local, small business entrusted to provide factual, unbiased reporting to the Southern Maryland Community. While we look to local businesses for advertising, we hope to keep that cost as low as possible in order to attract even the smallest of local businesses and help them get out to the public. We must also be able to pay employees(part-time and full-time), along with equipment, and website related things. We never want to make the Chronicle a “pay-wall” style news site.

To that end, we are looking to the community to offer donations. Whether it’s a one-time donation or you set up a reoccurring monthly donation. It is all appreciated. All donations at this time will be going to furthering the Chronicle through hiring individuals that have the same goals of providing fair, and unbiased news to the community. For now, donations will be going to a business PayPal account I have set-up for the Southern Maryland Chronicle, KDC Designs. All business transactions currently occur within this PayPal account. If you have any questions regarding this you can email me at davidhiggins@southernmarylandchronicle.com

Thank you for all of your support and I hope to continue bringing Southern Maryland the best news possible for a very long time. — David M. Higgins II




© 2019 The Southern Maryland Chronicle. All Rights Reserved. This website is not intended for users located within the European Economic Area.