The Chesapeake Bay Bridge as viewed from Sandy Point State Park in Anne Arundel County, Maryland.

Board of Public Works Approves Funding for Clean Water and the Chesapeake Bay

Grants and loans will reduce pollution, improve drinking water infrastructure

 

BALTIMORE, MD (September 5, 2018) – The Maryland Board of Public Works approved more than $6.8 million in grants and loans today to reduce pollution and improve a Western Maryland drinking water system. The board is composed of Governor Larry Hogan, Treasurer Nancy K. Kopp and Comptroller Peter Franchot.

“These are smart investments to protect public health and prevent water pollution in Maryland communities and the Chesapeake Bay,” said Maryland Environment Secretary Ben Grumbles. “Improving streams at an abandoned mine site and improving drinking water and sewage treatment systems will help us to green and grow the state’s economy and lead in the race to protect and restore Chesapeake Bay watersheds.”

The following projects were approved today:

 

Harbour View Wastewater Treatment Plant Enhanced Nutrient Removal Upgrade project – Cecil County

A $5,131,902 Bay Restoration Fund grant to Cecil County will help fund the planning, design and construction of an Enhanced Nutrient Removal (ENR) upgrade at the 65,000 gallons-per-day Harbour View Wastewater Treatment Plant. The project includes demolition and abandonment of the existing plant and construction of a new pump station and plant for ENR treatment. The upgrade will lead to an 83 percent reduction in nitrogen discharged and a 90 percent reduction in phosphorus discharged to the Elk River and ultimately the Chesapeake Bay. Excessive amounts of nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus lead to lowered levels of oxygen needed to support aquatic life in waterways, including the Chesapeake Bay. ENR upgrades of wastewater treatment plants are a critical component of Maryland’s Phase II Watershed Implementation Plan.

 

Smith Island Clean Water Project – Somerset County

Grants of $921,448 – a $673,102 Bay Restoration Fund grant and a $248,346 Chesapeake Bay Water Quality Supplemental Assistance grant – to Somerset County will help fund the planning, design and construction of a new Biological Nutrient Removal/Enhanced Nutrient Removal (BNR/ENR) wastewater treatment plant in Ewell and an upgrade to the wastewater collection and conveyance system. The project includes decommissioning the existing Tylerton Wastewater Treatment Plant, an overhaul of three pumping stations and the construction of a new main to convey wastewater from Tylerton to the new plant. The upgrade will lead to an 83 percent reduction in nitrogen discharged and a 90 percent reduction in phosphorus discharged to the Frances Gut and ultimately the Chesapeake Bay. Excessive amounts of nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus lead to lowered levels of oxygen needed to support aquatic life in waterways, including the Chesapeake Bay. ENR upgrades of wastewater treatment plants are a critical component of Maryland’s Phase II Watershed Implementation Plan.

 

Willowbrook Road 12-inch Waterline Replacement project – Allegany County

$750,500 in grants and loans to the city of Cumberland will help fund the replacement and lining of sections of a water line in Cumberland. The waterline is corroding, which causes frequent main breaks and service interruptions. The project is designed to improve the system to provide a safe and reliable water supply. The funding consists of a $627,965 Drinking Water State Revolving Loan Fund loan and a $122,535 Water Supply Financial Assistance grant.

 

Upper Georges Creek Stream Sealing Project, Acid Mine Drainage Remediation:  Hoffman Drainage Tunnel Flow Monitoring Project – Allegany County

A $48,000 Mining Remediation Program grant to the U.S. Geological Survey will fund the continuation of the Upper Georges Creek Stream Sealing Project, Acid Mine Drainage Remediation: Hoffman Drainage Tunnel Flow Monitoring Project. The project is designed to remediate the loss of stream flow and resulting water contamination that can be caused by abandoned deep mines. This phase of the project includes continued monitoring and collection of data from a steam flow gauging station at the outflow of the Hoffman Drainage Tunnel for three years. Monitoring and establishing the baseline discharge prior to any stream channel lining work that might be done will assist in assessing hydrologic changes that could result from stream channel sealing projects in the Upper Georges Creek watershed.

The Southern Maryland Chronicle is a local, small business entrusted to provide factual, unbiased reporting to the Southern Maryland Community. While we look to local businesses for advertising, we hope to keep that cost as low as possible in order to attract even the smallest of local businesses and help them get out to the public. We must also be able to pay employees(part-time and full-time), along with equipment, and website related things. We never want to make the Chronicle a “pay-wall” style news site.

To that end, we are looking to the community to offer donations. Whether it’s a one-time donation or you set up a reoccurring monthly donation. It is all appreciated. All donations at this time will be going to furthering the Chronicle through hiring individuals that have the same goals of providing fair, and unbiased news to the community. For now, donations will be going to a business PayPal account I have set-up for the Southern Maryland Chronicle, KDC Designs. All business transactions currently occur within this PayPal account. If you have any questions regarding this you can email me at davidhiggins@southernmarylandchronicle.com

Thank you for all of your support and I hope to continue bringing Southern Maryland the best news possible for a very long time. — David M. Higgins II




© 2019 The Southern Maryland Chronicle. All Rights Reserved. This website is not intended for users located within the European Economic Area.